Sponsorship - Euro 2012 Boosts Adidas Sales; Watchdog Bans Nike Twitter Campaign

Bookmark and Share
Euro 2012 Boosts Adidas Sales

Adidas is raising its 2012 forecast for football sales to a record of more than $2 billion, up from the $1.9 billion earned around the 2010 FIFA World Cup.
The adidas Tango 12 is UEFA's official matchball for Euro 2012. (Getty Images)

"Football is the heart and soul of our company and is what has made Adidas great," CEO Herbert Hainer was quoted by Reuters. 

"We have gained market share according to all the numbers I have."

Hainer was speaking from Warsaw, one of the eight host cities for Euro 2012.

Three of the eight teams remaining in the draw don adidas kits, including runaway bestseller Germany.

Replica match balls are reportedly also going fast, with more than seven million in sales projected this year.

Hainer, for his part, is rooting for a Spain v Germany final.

"These two teams are still my favourites,” he said. “It would be a great repetition of the 2008 final.”

Ads Watchdog Bans Nike Twitter Campaign

Wayne Rooney and Jack Wilshere are among the Nike athletes involved in a Twitter campaign just banned by the UK’s advertising watchdog.
Nike is a longtime sponsor of Wayne Rooney. Pictured here is a photocall ahead of the 2006 FIFA World Cup in Germany. (Getty Images)

The Guardian reports that recent tweets by the Manchester United forward and Arsenal midfielder made use of the “Make It Count” hashtag, a branded tagline of Nike – but not necessarily an obvious one, according to the Advertising Standards Authority.

“My resolution — to start the year as a champion, and finish it as a champion…#makeitcount gonike.me/makeitcount” said Rooney, who has more than 4 million followers.

“In 2012, I will come back for my club — and be ready for my country.#makeitcount.gonike.me/Makeitcount” tweeted Wilshere. 

“We considered that the Nike reference was not prominent and could be missed,” said the ASA. 

“In the absence of such an indication, for example #ad, we considered the tweets were not obviously identifiable as Nike marketing communications and therefore concluded they breached the [advertising] code.

"The ads must no longer appear. We told Nike to ensure that its advertising was obviously identifiable as such."

By INSIDER's Matthew Grayson

Your best source of news about the global football business is World Football INSIDER


Get Free WFI news bulletins Click Here




(Copyright 1992 - , all rights reserved. The information in this report may not be published, excerpted, or otherwise distributed in print or broadcast without the express prior consent of World Football Insider and Around the Rings, Inc.)

 WFI Spotlight